What Happened To Hip Hop?

What Happened To Hip Hop?

WHAT HAPPENED TO HIP HOP?


     Hip Hop as a culture is a great thing, but that's where it has lost its way; it's no longer a culture. Instead, it has turned into a money-making machine, and although there is nothing wrong with making money, that's not what Hip Hop was originally about. Rather than representing the streets and your community, Hip Hop is now an individual thing.

      "Hip Hop was once an Ivy League institution, and now it’s become a community college—you don’t need any qualifications to come on in. And, quite frankly, it can be a little exaggerated. There’s a low entry level, and it’s become monotonous and congested. All you need to do is be able to rhyme “cat” and “hat,” and you can become an MC. But executives have a lot to do with the larger agenda to emasculate and take possession of. I believe Hip Hop is being used in some mass way to influence underachievement. Maybe these individuals may not be aware of the larger agenda, and how they’re being puppeteered, but if they are, that’s even more shameful"- CeeLo Green

      This powerful weapon, which was once respected, revered and even feared, is now a mere toy to be played with by any and everybody. Back in the day everything was based off of good lyrics, not just the beat. Obviously things change, people move on, and the world keeps on spinning. But in Hip Hop's case, I don't understand how it has moved away from its roots, other than because of the music industry forcing it away with the lure of money. Because if you take a look at the inner city today, where Hip Hop started, poverty and crime are probably worse than ever.

     There are tons of news websites that are reporting every day about peoples' struggles and yet there is only a small amount of Hip Hop artists that are representing them - a.k.a. "Underground Hip Hop". What's worse though, is that even the people living in the inner city that are jumping into the Hip Hop game, are not even representing where they came from. Instead, they're faking it and spitting lyrics of fame and fortune because that's what the industry is telling them to do. Needless to say, over-commercialization and its resulting restrictions and limitations have been very damaging and distorting to the inherent nature of the Hip Hop culture.






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